Lunar Eclipse December 10, 2011 Seen Clearly in North America, Australia, Canada and More (Pictures)

in Education

The last total lunar eclipse of 2011, Lunar Eclipse December 2011 is said to appear in the western sky Saturday morning just before dawn in the west coast of the U.S. The eclipse will reportedly begin at 4:45 a.m. PST when a red shadow starts to cover the moon which will totally come under the southern part of the Earth’s shadow at 6:06 a.m. PT and emerge after 51 minutes. In Alaska, Hawaii, northwestern Canada, Australia, New Zealand and central and eastern Asia ringside view of the second total lunar eclipse of the year can be had. Furthermore, in North America, skywatchers located in western Canada and the United States should have a great view of the eclipse. It is interesting to know that during the eclipse, the moon will darken and show an unpredictable range of different colors as the Earth blocks the sun's rays, which is known as the Rayleigh scattering.


Lunar eclipse is a regular phenomenon and occurs at least once every year and may go up to four times a year. A total of seven eclipses can be seen in a year. A total lunar eclipse occurs when the moon, following its orbit around us, passes directly behind Earth as seen from the sun. This Lunar Eclipse December 2011 will be the second total lunar eclipse this year. The first was on June 15. Unlike the solar eclipse, a lunar eclipse can be watched with the naked eyes and it is also perfectly safe to venture out in the light of the eclipsed moon. If you miss Saturday's eclipse, there will be a partial one next June 4 and there will not be a total lunar eclipse again until April 15, 2014.


Looking in the western sky Saturday morning before dawn, you will be rewarded with the last total lunar eclipse of 2011

Looking in the western sky Saturday morning before dawn, you will be rewarded with the last total lunar eclipse of 2011


For just under an hour, the disk of the full moon will almost disappear, turning a dark, rusty red

For just under an hour, the disk of the full moon will almost disappear, turning a dark, rusty red


The eclipse will reportedly begin at 4:45 a.m. PST, totally come under the southern part of the Earth’s shadow at 6:06 a.m. PT and emerge after 51 minutes

The eclipse will reportedly begin at 4:45 a.m. PST, totally come under the southern part of the Earth’s shadow at 6:06 a.m. PT and emerge after 51 minutes


This will be the second and the last total lunar eclipse this year. The first time was on June 15, 2011

This will be the second and the last total lunar eclipse this year. The first time was on June 15, 2011


After Saturday’s total lunar eclipse, the next lunar eclipse will not take place for almost another three years, on April 15, 2014

After Saturday’s total lunar eclipse, the next lunar eclipse will not take place for almost another three years, on April 15, 2014

Lunar Eclipse December 10 2011 Is Seen Clearly in North America, Australia, Canada and More (Pictures)

 

Related links:

Total Lunar Eclipse Worldwide in Pictures

Total Lunar Eclipse June 15: Longest in a Decade

First Solar Eclipse Worldwide in 2011

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Henry Funk has 365 articles online and 19 fans

Studying materials on education, Eric Giguere prefers reading and writing. In his spare time, Eric often joins literature clubs to share his interest with others.

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Lunar Eclipse December 10, 2011 Seen Clearly in North America, Australia, Canada and More (Pictures)

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This article was published on 2011/12/10