Most Unexpected Nature Killers

in Education

We sometimes think that tiny animal species may hardly find food to maintain their lives but actually, many of them can become dangerous hunters whenever they observe suitable preys by different ways. You can know a little bit about the unexpected nature killers through some information provided by this article.

 

Whether you believe or not, a large number of “sea stars” are predators that often attack slower moving or unmoving preys such as snails, corals and sponges. However, “ambush stars” are the strangest because they can stand up on their arms to form a “tent” out of their broad and flat bodies. When an unsuspecting prey seeks shelter underneath, the star catch the victim and digests it alive over the next few days.

 


Starfish

Starfish

 


Sea sponge, which may look like plants or fungi, is one of the simplest and most ancient forms of animal life and can feed on bacteria or other microscopic particles surrounding water. However, the genus Chondrocladia\'s members adapt to a diet of tiny crustaceans and inhabit such creepy locales underwater caves and deep-sea abysses.

 


Sea Sponges

Sea Sponges

 


If you are interested in biology, you may be familiar with humble planarian, a primitive and nearly brainless animal. Most species of this kind inhabit in water and a few can be found slithering on dry land but all of them are sometimes carnivorous.

 


Planarian

Planarian

 


Mussel, also known “Bivalves”, include the clams, oysters, scallops and other dual-shelled mollusks. They can feed on plankton when pumping seawater in and out of tubular siphons. Though the species have lack of teeth, their gizzards may be lined with tough chitin to help grind up preys.

 


Mussels

Mussels

 


Katydids, usually tree-dwelling leaf eaters, are best known for the male’s nocturnal mating calls. However, the Chlorobalius leucoviridis from Australia modifies its mating call to sound like that of an entirely different insect. Amazingly, the same katydid species can recognize and imitate the call of any cicada it hears, including creatures not found in Australia.

 


Katydids

Katydids

 


Few insect-eating caterpillars are inch-worms native to Hawaii and often imitate twigs or leaves to catch preys that wander too close. Another Hawaiian caterpillar feeds on snails by lodging its own cocoon under snails’ shells to prevent their escape. However, bagworm Perisceptis carnivora of Panama is the most morbid of all because it can hide itself in a protective casing built from the remains of its food and its smell may serve to attract even more victims.

 


A strange Hawaiian Caterpillar

A strange Hawaiian Caterpillar

 

 

 

Related links:

Most Dangerous Nature Killers Worldwide

Insect Killer

Weed Killer Chemicals

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Elisa Wasson has 402 articles online and 10 fans

I am 25 years old, and I study materials on education, likes reading and writing. In free time, I often join literature clubs and share my interest with others.

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This article was published on 2011/01/13