New-Found Species in New Guinea

in Education

New Guinea Island is home to the highest diversity of tree-dwelling marsupials in the world with 38 unusual species. Moreover, this island is notable for one of the world's "last truly unspoilt tropical wildernesses" covering less than 0.5 percent of Earth's landmass but is home to 6 - 8 percent of its species. Here is the list we compiled about new-found species in New Guinea.

 

Rainbow Fish

The rainbow fish are a family of small, colorful, freshwater fish found in northern and eastern Australia and New Guinea and in the Southeast Asian islands. They are thought to have evolved from the evolutionary species like marine silversides. Rainbow fish has become very popular in the past two decades, due to their beautiful colors and peaceful nature. New Guinea has some of the most beautiful freshwater fish found anywhere, including small fish and colorful rainbows. Seven new species of the rainbow, including Chilatherina alleni (pictured) was found in New Guinea during the decade-long survey.


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Chilatherina alleni - one member of Rainbow Fish - is newly found in New Guinea


Wattled Smoky Honeyeater

The wattled smoky honeyeater was found in 2005 during an expedition of Conservation International into the mist-shrouded Foja Mountains of Indonesia's Papua Province. This type of birds avoided detection for so long because of two reasons: Very few villagers ventured into sacred mountains according to their opinion, and unusual species of honeyeaters doesn't make much noise.


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The Wattled Smoky Honeyeater was found in 2005 during an expedition of Conservation International into the mist-shrouded Foja Mountains of Indonesia's Papua Province


Fleshy-Flowered Orchid


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The fleshy-flowered orchid (or Cadetia kutubu), one of eight new orchid species which were found in New Guinea's Kikori region over a decade period


Blue-Eyed Spotted Cuscus

The blue-eyed spotted cuscus (Spilocuscus wilsoni) is a small marsupial found in 2004 Indonesian New Guinea. It is said that New Guinea Island is home to the highest diversity of tree-dwelling marsupials in the world with 38 unusual species.


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Blue-Eyed Spotted Cuscus was marsupial found in 2004 Indonesian New Guinea


Snub-Fin Dolphin

In 2005, an unexpected discovery has been made in the south coast of New Guinea: a new species of dolphins called snub fin. Although at the first time, this kind of dolphin was similar to Irrawaddy dolphin, after that it was determined that the snub-fin as their own species, with a different color, skull shape, and fin and flipper measurements. Snub-fin dolphin is the first new species found anywhere in at least three decades.


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Snub-Fin Dolphin was found in New Guinea in 2005, which is considered as an unexpected discovery


"Magnificent" Orchid


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In 2003, the "magnificent" pink orchid Dendrobium limpidum was formally named. However, in spite of the recent detection, the flower and other natural riches in New Guinea may soon disappear by logging or subsistence agriculture


Turquoise Lizard


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Turquoise Lizard was discovered on the island of Batanta, off the Peninsula of Papua in 2001 and is currently one of the most spectacular reptile discoveries anywhere


Giant Bent-Toed Gecko


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43 new-found reptile species on New Guinea during ten-year period, including this giant bent-toed gecko which was discovered in 2001 in Indonesia


New-Found Species in New Guinea

 

Related links:

New species found in Papua New Guinea

Notable New Species Discovered in 2010

10 never-before-seen species in deep Atlantic Ocean

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Elisa Wasson has 402 articles online and 10 fans

Studying materials on education, Eric Giguere prefers reading and writing. In his spare time, Eric often joins literature clubs to share his interest with others.

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This article was published on 2011/07/01